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Message Board > Patterns and Notions > Mini Irons ( Moderated by Sharon1952)

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Mini Irons
Could I use it for this too?
Canadian Jane
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Canadian Jane
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Date: 7/1/12 11:17 AM

I am thinking that a mini iron would be a handy thing to have for sewing projects.

But, I am also wondering if I can use it for every day ironong tasks such as ironing those tiny pleats just above the cuffs on my DH's work shirts.

It is soooo hard and time consuming to get those looking good with my big ole clunky iron. Not too mention I crease other areas just trying to get this right! I do use a long, slender sewing ham and that only helps so much.

On one of his shirts, I threatened to cut the shirt off just below the elbow and put in an elastic casing! (He doesn't want short sleeve shirts - they don't look right with a tie in his opinion.)

Would using a mini iron work for this? Any brand you can recommendation (or avoid)?

I also wonder how else people use this little irons?

Oh... and if you have any tips on how to press those wretched cuff pleats.... please share!!

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Forgiveness does not excuse the behaviour. It prevents the behaviour from breaking your heart over and over again.

nancy2001
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In reply to Canadian Jane <<


Date: 7/1/12 3:58 PM

I own two mini irons Petite Press and Clover. I never use them because they take too long to heat up and because the heated soleplates are so small, ironing or pressing anything with them takes far too long.

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No sewing project is ever a complete success nor a total failure.

Sharon1952
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In reply to Canadian Jane <<


Date: 7/1/12 5:03 PM

They aren't worth the effort. I only use them with the metallic papers that gild fabrics.

Check out youtube for videos on how to iron a man's shirt. I actually learned some tricks even after 50 years of ironing.

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Sewing: A creative mess is better than tidy idleness. ~Author Unknown

LynnRowe
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In reply to Canadian Jane <<
thumbsup 3 members like this.


Date: 7/1/12 5:40 PM

At the risk of being brutally blunt (my apologies in advance!) the mini irons are fine for crafting. For fine sewing and garments, they're garbage.

Rant Mode On:

I do not and never will understand why so many of us sewers will pay thru the nose for top quality sewing machines and Sergers and CS machines and fabrics and patterns...and then cheap out on ESSENTIALS such as needles (please change them at least after EVERY project, everyone!), threads, and pressing equipment!

The proper pressing equipment, in particular, can and will make or break a garment. You can sew a not so perfect seam, and perfect pressing will save it...but sew a perfect seam and crap pressing will ruin it. Same goes with finished garments.

IMO, pressing is MORE important than sewing, when it comes to beautifully finished garments, before, during and after!

If your iron is huge and clunky and won't properly press those pleats, you need to invest in a good quality pressing iron. It will pay for itself for years, and be a far better value and bargain than any mini iron.

People gasp in horror when they hear what I paid for my iron (Naomoto gravity feed); but over the years I've had it, and the years I will have it, and the superb professional pressing it does both during garment construction and on finished garments, I'm making out like a bandit. And my garments are, too.

Rant Mode Off:

So to answer your question, I would save the mini iron for crafting.

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I heart Panzy, Pfaff Creative Performance, the sewing machine love of my life!
And Baby (Enlighten serger), Victor (BLCS), Rupert (Pfaff 2023-knits expert) Ash (B350SE-Artwork), Kee (B750QEE-Panzy's BFF), Georgie (B560-Kee's baby sister) and the Feather-Flock!

Most of all, I heart Woo (HimmyCat). Until we meet again, my beautiful little boy. I love you.

Canadian Jane
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Date: 7/1/12 5:44 PM

I was afraid of that!

I checked out the video. Apparently I am trying to acheive the impossible! Sure did like her iron though.

Might try experiementing with putting a rolled up towel in the sleeve - or something like that and see if I can get a better result without re-creasing everything else I just ironed. Sometimes the ham seems too stiff.

Thanks for the feedback!



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Forgiveness does not excuse the behaviour. It prevents the behaviour from breaking your heart over and over again.

LynnRowe
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In reply to Canadian Jane <<


Date: 7/1/12 5:48 PM

Do you have a seam roll? Another helpful tool is to purchase a half-round wood dowel from Home Depot etc, and sew up a flannel sleeping baggie for it. Slip the dowel into the flannel baggie, and you have a fabulous seam roll. Dowels come in all sorts of sizes, so you can choose the size that best fits the area you're pressing.

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I heart Panzy, Pfaff Creative Performance, the sewing machine love of my life!
And Baby (Enlighten serger), Victor (BLCS), Rupert (Pfaff 2023-knits expert) Ash (B350SE-Artwork), Kee (B750QEE-Panzy's BFF), Georgie (B560-Kee's baby sister) and the Feather-Flock!

Most of all, I heart Woo (HimmyCat). Until we meet again, my beautiful little boy. I love you.

beauturbo
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In reply to Canadian Jane <<


Date: 7/1/12 6:50 PM

I think they don't have steam most times, and I would not even try to use one, to iron a garment. But the ones that are a bit more like a soldering iron with just a long metal piece with a tiny plate sticking out, I have used when I want to do a machine embroidered applique in a hoop sometimes, because then if you have iron on wonder under or such under you applique fabric, then after you sew and cut it, you can still use that tiny plate to iron down your applique and make that melt onto your base fabric, while it's still in a plastic hoop, with out more by accident hitting the plastic hoop sides with it, (like what might happen if you used a regular sized iron since those are a lot bigger)and melting your plastic hoops. So I do think that kind is good for that kind of thing.

I don't iron button down shirts all that very often, but when I do, I got sort of a pressing order going. After the actual cuff is ironed down, and after the sleeve and any placket is ironed down , then I just use the pointed edge of the ironing board, with the cuff stretched out opened on it, (shirt hanging of the edge of the ironing board by sleeve and supported by me, and then use the tip of a normal iron with a burst of steam minimally, over any little shirt cuff pleats.

If I really had to spend all day or even any time everyday, ironing button down shirts (which is not going to happen) then I think I would actually get a ironing press instead, and get a system going in ironing them all in a row, more like that there instead most likely.

Canadian Jane
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In reply to LynnRowe <<


Date: 7/1/12 7:20 PM

Quote: LynnRowe
If your iron is huge and clunky and won't properly press those pleats, you need to invest in a good quality pressing iron. It will pay for itself for years, and be a far better value and bargain than any mini iron.

People gasp in horror when they hear what I paid for my iron (Naomoto gravity feed); but over the years I've had it, and the years I will have it, and the superb professional pressing it does both during garment construction and on finished garments, I'm making out like a bandit. And my garments are, too

Point taken and I totally agree. I was taught one of the most critical steps in sewing (garments in particular) was the pressing.

I don't have room for a gravity feed iron or one with a boiler. I definitely need a better iron that what I have now. (Canadian Tire Shark). It works great for pressing seams flat and general iron - just can't get into those tiny cuff pleats the way I would like.

It seems that I go through an iron every 2.5 years about no matter what I pay for them. Sigh... might look at the Rowena she was using because at least for the 2 years it works - well - it might just work. I have to say I am sick of buying expensive things that crap out, and well as cheap things that don't work. Both end up in the landfill.
I have a sleeve roll - I think - I call it a sewing ham but it is long and slender. That is what I use. I will also try the dowel suggestion. That might help.

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Forgiveness does not excuse the behaviour. It prevents the behaviour from breaking your heart over and over again.

Miss Fairchild
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In reply to Canadian Jane <<


Date: 7/1/12 7:50 PM

After many frustrating years of wrinkled ironing, and envying all those people having nice irons, including gravity feed, I had to give up. I don't have the ability to have a gravity feed iron in my sewing room, let alone a 1500 watt iron; it just won't work with the electrical in my house!

So, failing that, and knowing I wanted my sleeves to look good, I decided I'd use a rolled up towel. I used to use a magazine, but the ink bled through to the fabric once and I put the Kabasch on that! So I keep an old hand towel in my sewing room. It's much, much better than a seam roll because a seam roll has only about 2-3" of space; the towel has more and it acts the same way.

So save your pennies and use a towel!

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sew2006
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Date: 7/1/12 8:48 PM

I use the small clover iron for doing applique in the hoop to avoid contacting a large iron to the hoop as the other poster also mentioned. It's has a nice small tip. A friend of mine gave me a small Proctor Silex travel iron that I use with no water when pressing bindings on knit tops. I use it with a damp cloth and it works well in the summer heat. Nothing replaces a good iron.

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