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Forum > Fabrics and more... > Grainline advice needed! ( Moderated by CynthiaSue)

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Grainline advice needed!
(Warp and woof sound like Star Trek characters to me...)
jadamo00
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jadamo00
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Date: 7/13/12 6:34 AM

THE REVIEW:
In a bolt of fabric, warp are the threads that run from cut end to cut end.

Woof are the threads that run from selvedge to selvedge.

THIS excellent information about grainline from Threads says that because the warp (cut end to cut end) threads are tightly stretched in weaving, there is little stretch here.

But that there will be more stretch in the woof threads (selvedge to selvedge).

THE BACKGROUND: I'm cutting a vest from Buffalo Plaid wool. Maybe I'm kidding myself but I think it looks better if the pattern pieces are placed lengthwise from selvedge to selvedge (woof) than the usual placement, lengthwise along the warp (cut end to cut end).

(Finally...) THE QUESTION: In your opinion and with your experience: with woven fabrics, does it matter on which grainline you place your garment. (cut end to cut end, or selvedge to selvedge).

My scissors are poised as I await your wisdom.



j.
-- Edited on 7/16/12 7:07 AM --

LynnRowe
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In reply to jadamo00 <<
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Date: 7/13/12 9:32 AM

it matters a very great deal in most knits. In wovens, it is usually less of a deal. garments generally hang better when cut on the lengthwise grain, and the LW grain is more stable. But if your fabric drapes and hangs to your liking on the cross grain, and the pattern is better that way, then go for it!

Grainlines are there to be played with; pattern grain lines are suggestions, not law. The really important thing with grain is to be on-grain, whether that's the length, cross, or bias. Hold up a handful of your fabric along the cross grain; compare the drape when you do likewise to the lengthwise grain. Still prefer the look on the cross grain? Now you've done your "designer due diligence", you can make your choice as to the best layout for your fabric and pattern.

With a woven wool vest, you shouldn't have any problems changing to the crossgrain.

------
I heart Woo (HimmyCat). Until we meet again, my beautiful little boy. I love you.

Doris W. in TN
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Doris W. in TN  Friend of PR
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In reply to jadamo00 <<
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Date: 7/13/12 9:37 AM

Quote: jadamo00

(Finally...) THE QUESTION: In your opinion and with your experience: with woven fabrics, does it matter on which grainline you place your garment. (cut end to cut end, or selvedge to selvedge).

Generally, yes, But with a border print, I'll run the grains in the wrong direction to use that border print.

For a vest, I think you should be fine, especially if you line it.

------
iPad's auto-correct is my enema.

jadamo00
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jadamo00
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Date: 7/13/12 9:47 AM

Doris and Lynn:

Thank you thank you thank yooooou.



j.

Bernadette W
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Date: 7/14/12 11:09 AM

http://www.taunton.com/threads/pdf/Grainline.pdf

This link should work for the Threads article on grainline, for the "warp" and "weft" explanation.

I believe the "woof" term is only used when "Sewing for Puppies".

sings2high
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Date: 7/14/12 12:08 PM

Woof is used interchangeably with weft. In the United States, the term "filling" is also used.
"weft, texture, fabric," from Old English: owef, from o- "on" + wefan "to weave"

However, as an English surname, it and all the similar names descend from the Viking Ulf or Ulfr, both meaning "wolf". So I guess it does all come back to "Sewing with Wolves", yes?
-- Edited on 7/14/12 12:11 PM --

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Measure twice, cut once. While this saying is useful in many ways, I have no qualms about editing my posts.

Big Goal for 2015: to be able to say "Oh, I guess it's time to take this dress in...again!"

UFOs completed in 2015: 0
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sewn in 2015: 2.5 yds
bought in 2015: 12 yds

Muria
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Muria
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Date: 7/30/12 4:10 PM

The purse pattern I'm currently wrestling with wants me to cut several of the pieces on the cross-grain (a bottom "base" piece, a flap, and a pocket, specifically). Is there a reason to do so? The directions are also making me nuts, along with the fact that she uses a different bracket to indicate "cut on fold", but it's really weird to see "cut on fold" with the grainline perpendicular to the fold. (I'm making the pattern in this , which was $12 a yard and not on sale, so I really don't want to mess this up).
-- Edited on 7/30/12 4:12 PM --

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Muria

Where did all this fabric come from? I CAN'T have bought THAT much!

Muria
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Muria
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Date: 7/30/12 7:35 PM

For future reference, I heard back from the designer of the purse (Studio Kat Designs: it's the Baggalista), and she said that grain tends to be irrelevant on purses, and that the grainlines on that particular pattern are more like "this end up" arrows so that if you're using a directional pattern, you don't get it wrong by accident.

I think we just think in different ways, as far as the directions go. The pattern looks well-designed, though I may try to tweak it a bit by increasing the seam allowances (my last purse fell apart because the 1/4" seam allowances wore out over time).

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Muria

Where did all this fabric come from? I CAN'T have bought THAT much!

Nancy K
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In reply to jadamo00 <<


Date: 7/30/12 9:13 PM

FYI, it's weft and warp, and no it generally makes little difference if you lay out on the straight grain, parallel to the selvedge or cross grain selvedge to selvedge which are the terms used in sewing.

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TessKwiltz
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Date: 7/31/12 3:10 PM

"When we work in the mill, weaving at the loom
You gaze absentminded at the roof
And half the time your shuttle gets twisted in the threads
Til you can't tell the warp from the woof..."

Oops, sorry, I played Carrie Pipperidge in high school. That takes me back 35 years.

What were we talking about?

------
Tess

"I am a degenerate art supply junkie" - Jane Davenport

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