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I tried it out today
Singer Industrial
Miss Fairchild
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Miss Fairchild
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Date: 10/18/12 1:07 AM

My exercise class was having a monthly party at a member's house today. Come to find out, she's a tailor by trade. And in her sewing room there were the most fabulous, and old machines; all industrial Singers. A coverstitch,, a blindstitch, a serger, and of course, a sewing machine. I've always been curious as to how industrial sewing machines work. I sat down at it, she showed me how to work the knee pedal to lift and lower the presser foot. And when I hit the treadle/foot pedal, the thing took off! Like lightning! Now I have to tell you, I like to think I'm a speed demon when it comes to sewing, and this machine would really suit my "addiction", but to tell you the truth, it was so fast, it scared me. I could see me sewing my finger on that thing--too, too fast. So I guess I won't be looking at these in the near future.

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"Play the cards you are dealt, but choose who is sitting at the table"..AARP magazine

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Yarndiva
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Date: 10/18/12 9:09 AM

I use a industrial machine and recall it was a bit hard to get used to the speed at first. That said, it is just some practice and you will be fine. Some can be adjusted to go a bit slower at the clutch if necessary in the mean time, though not like a home machine. When I sew at home now I am annoyed by the slowness of my sewing machines. Full circle.

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SouthernStitch
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In reply to Miss Fairchild <<


Date: 10/18/12 9:28 AM

I feel the same way. Personally, I think the really fast industrials are manageable for those who sew the same type seam every day, and are quite expert at it. They can learn real fast how to guide the fabric for that application. I know these machines are much smoother too, so I'm sure it's easy to manage, once you get used to it.

But for me, who is sewing all different types of things, it wouldn't work. I couldn't imagine doing a collar band or some such going so fast! I admire those who can handle that speed!

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Bernina 780, and 530
Juki TL2010
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Singer 403a

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beauturbo
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In reply to Miss Fairchild <<
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Date: 10/18/12 2:11 PM

You know, if you want one, and you think it's just way too fast or uncontrolable that way, just as is with an older, maybe more original motor on it, if you just put a nice servo motor under it instead, then I think it would be much /feel much more control-able. So I would not let that stop you at all, if you really want one. Of course I am also probably a horrible enablerAs I think that kind of thing, just has way more to do with the separate motor under it, than ever just the machine head it's self.

I have sewn on some even 1940's and older ones, and with the right motor underneath them, and even only sewing on them for less than 3 minutes, which would just not be "much time to get used to them at all" that way, having a different kind of and a nice way more contro-able stop on a dime, and sew slow or fast motor, or even be able to get stitch by stitch more easy kind of control with a motor, really does make a whole bunch of difference in sewing "feel" on something sometimes.

So, I think it's just the motor under the table, that contributes mostly to that, (the goes too fast to control or I'm not used to it feeling often) and not the machine head it's self . You get to choose what kind of motor you want, or could just switch very easy, any old time you want, as it's not even built into the machine at all. Just very separate, underneath the table instead. So I think that is a good thing there as lots of choices on anything is always good and better than not lots of choices and maybe something to think about.

the8dunlaps
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Date: 6/14/14 1:31 PM

Following
-- Edited on 6/14/14 1:33 PM --

kcurtis
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Date: 6/17/14 2:30 AM

If you decide to go that direction once you get use to the speed you'll love it. I keep my servo motor at about 1800 stitches per minute and with the pedal to the metal my seams come out perfectly straight and even every time. The key learning to control the fabric - not letting it control you. Well that and having to sew an order of 1000 shirts on a short deadline. I can sew up two side seams in 15 seconds flat. Oh, and NO pins are allowed in my shop! ;)

One of the things I like about my monster walking foot machine is I can hold the fabric a lot tighter than I could ever do on any home machine. It is strong enough to pull the fabric out of my grip keeping it nice and flat and sew a nice even stitch in the process. This is critical when sewing drapes. It prevents puckers in those long 10+ foot seams.

Industrial sergers sew a perfect seam as well. I have a Babylock Evolution and it can't touch the quality and consistency of my Juki 5 thread serger. Yeah, the Evolution can do the wave stitch, but I've never found a need for it personally.

After I've spent a full week on my industrial machines all of my home machines seem incredible slow to me. In the end speed is a relative thing.

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Just a hack that sews for a living. ;)

lgrande
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In reply to kcurtis <<


Date: 6/17/14 10:01 AM

Wow! That is impressive!

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Linda

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Al Johnson
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Date: 6/23/14 1:20 AM

I just got a new used walking foot heavy duty industrial, which will stitch 3500SPM max. This is just stupid fast as far as I'm concerned at this time. I might get used to that and be able to use it at some time in the future, but not now. I'm lucky that the clutch is smooth and I'm able to feather it for slower speed, and control the machine.

I've used a Consew light duty high speed (5000SPM) before, and I thought it was like driving a Ferrari 200MPH on an expressway. It was smooth, quiet, and insanely fast. This walking foot heavy duty machine, at top speed, is like driving a dump truck on a gravel road at 100MPH. It's loud, rough, and still insanely fast.

But I'm looking forward to getting used to it!

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A sewing machine is just a welder for textiles.

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