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Information on industrial sewing machines and serger
industrial sewing machines
angeleyes88
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angeleyes88
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Date: 1/1/13 1:37 PM

I really love the Janome horizon 7700 that I tried out recently but don't want to rush out and make a hasty decision about a new machine. I currently have a fairly basic computerized janome sewing machine which I love but sometimes feel limited to the throat space and really heavy fabrics (like denim or heavyweight wool). For the cost of a horizon or even a bernina sewing machine - I could buy an industrial serger and industrial sewing machine. Eventually, I plan to open a small home-based business - home dec. draperies, and basic alterations.

I want to look into industrial sewing machine firstly but i'm having a hard time with finding information about them. Ie the different feed options - I know they only do one task such as a straight stitch, buttonhole, bartack etc but I love the speed and the idea they don't break down as much. I would still have a domestic for buttonhole and zigzag so I would only need a striaght stitch machine. Any linkies would be appreciated.

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Elcue
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In reply to angeleyes88 <<


Date: 1/1/13 2:45 PM


I've used industrial sergers. I own a Babylock Imagine. All home sergers feel like toys after using an industrial machine. In Seattle there is C.H. Holderby that could give you some information. I favor Sewing Machine Services but their website doesn't have any info. A phone call might be worthwhile.


http://www.chholderby.com/industrial-sewing-machines/sergers-overlocks/

http://sewingmachineservice.com/index.cfm

Good Luck!





loti
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In reply to angeleyes88 <<


Date: 1/1/13 5:21 PM

I have an industrial and it does straight, reverse and zigzag. It's a Singer 20u, it's been in the family about 30 years. I've taken in it once, but I oil and clean it regularly. It comes with a straight stitch plate that you can use when you are working with fine fabrics. It's actually the plate and feed dogs that get switched out.
You can also get special feet for it, similar to what is available for the vintage mechanical machines, but they are high shank for the 20u. I have an invisible zipper foot, narrow hem foot, and even a buttonhole attachment (which I have never used but my mother used to use). This would be a great machine for basic alterations.


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"A girl should be two things: classy and fabulous.
Coco Chanel

Stash Sewn in 2011 148.5 Yds
Stash Sewn in 2012.... counting...

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Welmoed Sisson
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Welmoed Sisson
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Date: 1/1/13 5:35 PM

I would highly recommend getting a servo motor as opposed to a clutch motor. The clutch motor is always turning (and making noise) as long as the machine is turned on, even if you're not sewing. With a servo motor, it's like a regular sewing machine, and only runs when the pedal is pressed. SO much more pleasant in the sewing room.
My Juki DDL5550N-7 was a Craigslist find (for only $400!) and I love using it. Going back to a regular home machine is just sooooo slow. I did have an industrial 5-thread serger when I had my drapery business, but it had a clutch motor and was a royal pain to thread, so I sold it.
One thing to consider is who will service it. Industrial machines really aren't portable, so you'll need to find a service tech who is willing to come to your house and maintain it (or learn to do it yourself).
--Welmoed

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angeleyes88
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angeleyes88
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In reply to Welmoed Sisson <<


Date: 1/1/13 8:09 PM

this is about the only thing that I know I would want in it as I would be sewing mostly at night while the kids slept in my (soon to be) new attic sewing room. Are all industrial sewing machines able to accept servo motors?

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Jennifer Hill
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In reply to angeleyes88 <<


Date: 1/2/13 0:40 AM

If the machine is powered by a motor bolted to the table, and belted to the hand wheel, you can use any type of motor. I have heard that there are very modern indies that have integrated motors, but don't know how common they are. All the industrials I've played with are old/vintage/antique, and can be powered by clutch motors, servos, or even treadles.

Jennifer in Calgary

TailorsDen
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Date: 1/2/13 7:57 AM

It may be worth your time to visit some places that sell industrial equipment and try them out. I live in Canada. Where I am, not too far from Toronto and Montreal which still have garment districts and thus these machines are readily available, industrial used straight stitch machines, usually older models, sell for anywhere from $500 - 900, with sergers running considerably more. This includes the regular motor that hums ALL the time.

About 8 years ago I bought a brand new Sunstar industrial straight stitch with Servo motor, programmable automatic backstitch, and automatic thread cutter. Bought it over the phone from a dealer in Alberta, 3 provinces away from me, and had it shipped, delivered to my home, carried downstairs and set up. The total cost for machine, taxes, delivery and set up was about $2700 Cdn. Yes, it was a lot of money but when I thought about it logically, I realized that most mid line domestic machines would have cost more than that by the time taxes (15% at that time) were figured in. There are a lot of options out there these days for not so bad prices but you have to familiarize yourself with what's available.

In addition to the price of the used machine, a new Servo motor might cost you anywhere from $400-600 to have installed on your machine, based on pricing here, and an older machine might still be just the basic straight stitch with no additional goodies like the thread cutter which is a really nice feature if you can get it.

This straight stitch is a dream to use and Welmoed is so right about those Servo motors. That constant hum of the regular motor was really bad to be around for any length of time..... and I'm hearing impaired, lol! Just to add, I also have an older model Wilcox & Gibbs industrial serger and yes, it serges like a charm, but would you believe that it hasn't been used in 5 years because of that regular motor. It's just a lot comfortable for me to use my old mechanical serger.

Gayle

TailorsDen
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Date: 1/2/13 8:05 AM

I just realized that you are also from Ontario and, checking your website, see that we have some similar skills Feel free to pm me and, if you're anywhere near me, you're welcome to come and see/play with my machines in person.

Gayle

angeleyes88
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angeleyes88
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In reply to TailorsDen <<


Date: 1/3/13 12:15 PM

thanks. I appreciate the offer. I'm south of Hamilton Ontario. I have to find some time to try out machines - it's just hard with 3 kiddos under 5 and dh who works flip flopping shifts - that's why I want to research and narrow it down to 3 or 4 that I would like to try. I spent an 1 testing out the horizon which was so nice (no kids lol).

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dscheidt

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In reply to Jennifer Hill <<


Date: 1/3/13 8:00 PM

Quote: Jennifer Hill
If the machine is powered by a motor bolted to the table, and belted to the hand wheel, you can use any type of motor. I have heard that there are very modern indies that have integrated motors, but don't know how common they are. All the industrials I've played with are old/vintage/antique, and can be powered by clutch motors, servos, or even treadles.



Jennifer in Calgary

I've got a collection of industrial machines. I have a Singer 20U33 (the machine mentioned above.), which I'm selling. I put a servo motor on it, which wasn't very hard at all. If you can change a lightswitch, you can do that. It's a worthwhile upgrade.

But, like I said, it's for sale, largely because I don't have room with my new machine. I bought a Juki DDL-9000BSS (the SS means it's the normal model, for normal medium weight goods); it's a single needle straight stitch machine, Juki's top of the line machine. It's got a direct drive motor, auto thread cutter and control panel (all 9000b models have these), plus an electric foot lift and a thread wiper, which are options (but I couldn't fine a machine in an inventory that didn't have them, which is fine, because I wanted them (and you should too)). It's a nicer stitcher than the 20u, by a substantial margin. The 20u isn't bad at all, it's as good as any domestic machine I've used, and much better than most.

If I had space, I'd get an industrial serger (probalby a 3 / 5 thread one) in a heart beat. Even buying new, and high end, you'd be out less what a Bernina runs, if you bought both.
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