SIGNUP - FREE Membership and 1 FREE Sewing Lesson
| FAQ | Login
 

Forum > Pattern Modifications, Design Changes & Pattern Drafting > Need tips for working with slippery bias bindings!

Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview
Go to Page:
Need tips for working with slippery bias bindings!
gramma b
star
gramma b
USA
Member since 7/25/08
Posts: 3004
Send Message

      



Date: 2/19/13 8:27 AM

Any tips for pesky bias bindings for dressier tops in silkies, rayons, other slippery wovens?
I prefer self-made bias strips over facings for necks and sleeves. Using S1796, which has facings, for one tunic-length top.
I read some cut the binding wider than usual to hold onto, then trim after, but this would seem to make curving it harder?
Do you prefer turning to the outside or inside? Don't have a coverstitch and double needle won't work.

I am waiting to try this when Fat Quarters are 99 cents:
carolinafairdesigns.com shows a photo tutorial on how to cut
4 yds. of binding from a fat quarter.
-- Edited on 2/19/13 9:04 AM --

MarinaVK
star
MarinaVK  Friend of PR
Advanced
NY USA
Member since 9/19/09
Posts: 157
Send Message

      
thumbsup 2 members like this.



Date: 2/19/13 9:11 AM

I know that often sewers cut the bias strip and fold it into the shape right away, but I like to cut bias strips wider (at least 1/4" or 3/8" for more lightweight fabrics) and than steam press and stretch the strip as I press. The strip will get longer and narrower. Then, I adjust and cut the required width. Stretching out the bias strip while pressing with steam makes the strip more stable, otherwise it tends (especially in 'silkier' fabrics) to change its width while sewing. Because the strip is on bias it still works good on curves.

Also, every time work with new fabric, I like to make two samples, one for a straight seam and one for a curve. Appr. 4 inches for a sample...

Hope this helps :)

------
My blog: http://frabjous-fashion.blogspot.com
What I am working on now: one couture garment a month for my Burdastyle Couture Wardrobe Challenge at burdastyle.com

PattiAnnJ
star
PattiAnnJ
Advanced
OH USA
Member since 12/3/06
Posts: 7244
Send Message

      



In reply to gramma b <<
thumbsup 1 member likes this.


Date: 2/19/13 2:29 PM

You might try glue stick. I like Aleene's Tacky Glue sticks as they do not dry out between use.

As for making bias binding, there area as many tutorials out there as there are feathers on a duck's back side. Here is another one for continuous binding.

You can find the glue sticks at fabric and/or craft stores.

Test the glue on scraps of the intended fabric to make sure there will be no staining.

------
I dont give them Hell, I just tell the truth about them and they think its Hell. Harry Truman

"Improvise, adapt and overcome." - Clint Eastwood/Heartbreak Ridge

beauturbo
beauturbo
Advanced
CA USA
Member since 5/2/09
Posts: 3304
Send Message

      



In reply to gramma b <<


Date: 2/19/13 3:34 PM

The more slippery my fabric is, the more likely I would be to quickly hand baste something onto it, at least in some iffy places, particular if it needed to be "eased in" in some tricky tight place, rather than just sticking it in a machine with just only pins in it instead, and then be trying to be sewing over it, while removing pins and into it, only that way instead. If binding is very slippery woven, I do think it might be more easy to get looking nice on both sides, if a strip of it was folded double and sewn on there, then trimmed and turned and slip stitched down to the back side of it. Just because that way, your don't even need to try to make a fold and turn on the slippery loose free fabric edge on the back at all, as it would already be there and kind of pre-sewn in.
-- Edited on 2/19/13 3:36 PM --
-- Edited on 2/19/13 3:37 PM --

Elona
star
Elona  Friend of PR
Advanced
Member since 8/24/02
Posts: 8343
online now
Send Message

      



In reply to gramma b <<
thumbsup 1 member likes this.


Date: 2/19/13 3:56 PM

This article on bias binding suggests starching all bindings before applying them. Haven't tried it myself, but it's an interesting idea.

Nancy K
starstarstar
Nancy K
Advanced
NY USA
Member since 12/28/04
Posts: 8213
Send Message

      



In reply to gramma b <<
thumbsup 1 member likes this.


Date: 2/19/13 4:07 PM

I second Marina's comment and add another, but always test first. Spray starch is another option to make bindings easier to handle.

------
www.nancyksews.blogspot.com

rag doll
star
rag doll  Friend of PR
Intermediate
AUSTRALIA
Member since 1/31/06
Posts: 560
Send Message

      



In reply to gramma b <<
thumbsup 2 members like this.


Date: 2/20/13 3:33 AM

I like to firm up my fabric with Gelatine.

I mix about 2 teaspoons of gelatine in very warm water until dissolved and then tip this mixture into about 1 litre of warm water. I then wet the fabric that is going to be cut into bias strips and then dunk it in the gelatine mixture. I let this soak for a while, say 30 minutes and then lay it flat to dry so that the gelatine mixture doesn't drip out of the fabric. When the fabric is dry iron it and cut your bias strips. The mixture washes out very easily at first wash.

If you have one, use a straight stitch plate on your machine and a straight or patchwork foot as well. This may help you to handle flimsy fabric easier as the machine won't have a tendency to swallow your work down a wider hole.

To apply my bias it depends on the type of garment I am making as to the finish I use.

Method 1. Width of the bias strip = 2 x finished binding width + 1/2". Press the strip in half. With raw edges together and right sides of garment and binding together sew the binding on to the edge using a 1/4" SA. clip curves. press the bias to the wrong side with the sewn seam just to the inside. Slip stitch or topstitch to finish.

Method 2. Width of the bias strip = 2 x finished binding width + 1/2". instead of sewing the bias to the right side of the garment sew it to the wrong side. Right side of bias to the wrong side of the garment. Finish exactly as above but now you will have what I call a visible binding so that you see it on the right side. On anything sporty you can edge stitch the binding or Cover-stitch it on top of your bias binding. If more formal I will usually either use method 1 or a stitch in the ditch for method 2.

------
Brother QC1000, Brother PQ1500, Bernina Virtuosa 160, Pfaff (old), Babylock BLCS, Bernette 1100D, Bernette 334DS

Jeannine1976
star
Jeannine1976
Intermediate
TX USA
Member since 1/29/09
Posts: 78
Send Message

      
thumbsup 4 members like this.



Date: 2/20/13 11:33 PM

I baste with silk thread and a fairly short running stitch. The silk thread allows me to steam ease without marking the fashion fabric. The shorter stitches keep the bias tape from shifting. Overall, basting allows me more control than pins when placing the bias tape, and more freedom to sew uninterrupted at the machine.

I try to avoid making bias tape with synthetics (Wright's is a poly/cotton blend). If I do make bias tape from something like poly chiffon (something I'm doing right now, actually), then I use a few different tricks. Starch works great on natural fibers, but it just flakes off of synthetics. To set creases in single or double fold tape, I dampen a pressing cloth with a vinegar/water solution before using it with a steam iron. Once ironed, I allow the fashion fabric to cool briefly before moving it.

While at my ironing board, I use pins. Lots and lots of pins. Using the padding like a bulletin board, I pin as much as I need to in order for the bias tape to keep from squirming around while I fold and set the creases. Also, I keep a quilter's ruler handy, and frequently check the tape's depth. For example, if I cut it at one inch, I like to keep it there so that it has equal ability to contract and expand around curves. I do this when positioning the tape on the fashion fabric, as well, except I use a hem ruler for measuring depth. Sometimes I'm lazy and just eyeball it.

The only other thing I can think of is that practice makes perfect. My sister was matron of honour at her friend's traditional Indian wedding. She needed (read: wanted really badly and begged and pleaded until I caved in and said yes) a total of six different outfits for the events she was attending. Every fabric she chose was polyester crepe, and all six outfits required quite a bit of self-fabric bias binding. I was a superstar at the stuff by the time the wedding rolled around.

jadamo00
star
jadamo00
Advanced
NY USA
Member since 3/13/06
Posts: 1264
Send Message

      



Date: 2/21/13 7:00 AM

Whoa, a very timely post for me: I'm about to tackle the same problem! Thanks Gram!

j.

Elona
star
Elona  Friend of PR
Advanced
Member since 8/24/02
Posts: 8343
online now
Send Message

      



In reply to Jeannine1976 <<


Date: 2/21/13 3:03 PM

Quote:
...a total of six different outfits for the events she was attending. Every fabric she chose was polyester crepe, and all six outfits required quite a bit of self-fabric bias binding. I was a superstar at the stuff by the time the wedding rolled around.


And a HERO!
Go to Page:
Please LOGIN or Join PatternReview

printable version Printable Version

* Advertising and soliciting is strictly prohibited on PatternReview.com. If you find a post which is not in agreement with our Terms and Conditions, please click on the Report Post button to report it. Pattern Modifications, Design Changes & Pattern Drafting >> Need tips for working with slippery bias bindings!

 
adv. search»
pattern | machine | member
        
Create a Jacket Muslin
Create a Jacket Muslin

Register

Sew a Designer Unlined Jacket
Sew a Designer Unlined Jacket

Register

BurdaStyle Magazine 06-2010-131

photo
by: dintas

Review
Petite Plus 604 Pattern

Petite Plus 604 Pattern

Buy Now
Margo Handbag

Margo Handbag

Buy Now

Conditions of Use | Posting Guidelines | Privacy Policy | Shipping Rates | Returns & Refunds | Contact Us | About | New To PR | Advertising

Copyright © 2014 PatternReview.com® , OSATech, Inc. All rights reserved.