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Puffy sleeves
Want to add puffy sleeves to a sleeveless garment
CatalinaChick
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CatalinaChick
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Member since 3/12/09
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Date: 4/22/13 11:24 AM

I am going to be using kwik sew 2722. It's a sleeveless unitard and I need to add sheer puffy sleeves to it. I don't have any patterns that I can copy from. Any suggestions on how to measure for and increase the size of the sleeve from a regular cap sleeve pattern??

Mole Princess
Mole Princess
Member since 4/17/12
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Date: 4/23/13 9:21 AM

If you have a cap sleeve pattern that includes a tiny seam under the arm, then you may be able to slash and spread to get your sleeve. The hardest part of getting a sleeve right is the match to the armhole, both at the shoulder and the underarm, so if your cap sleeve pattern has an underarm, then lay it out, trace it without the seam allowances, cut it along parallel lines, spread the pieces apart, connect to form a sleeve-like curve, lengthen to taste, and copy again w/ seam allowances. Then gather before you put it in till it's the same length at the cap as your orig'l cap pattern.

If you want a full puff sleeve (puffs at cap and puffs where gathered into a cuff), spread the lines so they are still parallel. If you want more fullness at cap, spread more there and less lower down. If vice versa, vice versa. But try to leave the underarm area the same as it was unless very sure you want to change it. Leave it on the same grainline it was on before, and don't make the seamline longer in that area. This applies to a couple of inches along the sleeve seam under the arm--where the sleeve seam changes direction, all the way to the underarm seam of the sleeve.

Put more lines and more spreading where you want the fullness in the sleeve, and fewer or none elsewhere.

If your cap pattern does not have an underarm seam, it will be harder to figure out the shape of the sleeve, and you may want to buy a pattern--a cheap pattern you don't even like will do, so long as it has the right sleeve--then use the sleeve AND the armhole from that pattern.

Have fun! Slashing and spreading is a lot of fun for this kind of thing. You may want to test your sleeve in cheap fabric before you cut the good stuff, though. Enjoy!

CatalinaChick
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CatalinaChick
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CO USA
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Posts: 16
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In reply to Mole Princess <<


Date: 4/23/13 8:08 PM

Quote: Mole Princess
If you have a cap sleeve pattern that includes a tiny seam under the arm, then you may be able to slash and spread to get your sleeve. The hardest part of getting a sleeve right is the match to the armhole, both at the shoulder and the underarm, so if your cap sleeve pattern has an underarm, then lay it out, trace it without the seam allowances, cut it along parallel lines, spread the pieces apart, connect to form a sleeve-like curve, lengthen to taste, and copy again w/ seam allowances. Then gather before you put it in till it's the same length at the cap as your orig'l cap pattern.



If you want a full puff sleeve (puffs at cap and puffs where gathered into a cuff), spread the lines so they are still parallel. If you want more fullness at cap, spread more there and less lower down. If vice versa, vice versa. But try to leave the underarm area the same as it was unless very sure you want to change it. Leave it on the same grainline it was on before, and don't make the seamline longer in that area. This applies to a couple of inches along the sleeve seam under the arm--where the sleeve seam changes direction, all the way to the underarm seam of the sleeve.



Put more lines and more spreading where you want the fullness in the sleeve, and fewer or none elsewhere.



If your cap pattern does not have an underarm seam, it will be harder to figure out the shape of the sleeve, and you may want to buy a pattern--a cheap pattern you don't even like will do, so long as it has the right sleeve--then use the sleeve AND the armhole from that pattern.



Have fun! Slashing and spreading is a lot of fun for this kind of thing. You may want to test your sleeve in cheap fabric before you cut the good stuff, though. Enjoy!

Thank you!!!!
CatalinaChick
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CatalinaChick
Beginner
CO USA
Member since 3/12/09
Posts: 16
Send Message

      



In reply to Mole Princess <<


Date: 4/23/13 8:08 PM

Quote: Mole Princess
If you have a cap sleeve pattern that includes a tiny seam under the arm, then you may be able to slash and spread to get your sleeve. The hardest part of getting a sleeve right is the match to the armhole, both at the shoulder and the underarm, so if your cap sleeve pattern has an underarm, then lay it out, trace it without the seam allowances, cut it along parallel lines, spread the pieces apart, connect to form a sleeve-like curve, lengthen to taste, and copy again w/ seam allowances. Then gather before you put it in till it's the same length at the cap as your orig'l cap pattern.



If you want a full puff sleeve (puffs at cap and puffs where gathered into a cuff), spread the lines so they are still parallel. If you want more fullness at cap, spread more there and less lower down. If vice versa, vice versa. But try to leave the underarm area the same as it was unless very sure you want to change it. Leave it on the same grainline it was on before, and don't make the seamline longer in that area. This applies to a couple of inches along the sleeve seam under the arm--where the sleeve seam changes direction, all the way to the underarm seam of the sleeve.



Put more lines and more spreading where you want the fullness in the sleeve, and fewer or none elsewhere.



If your cap pattern does not have an underarm seam, it will be harder to figure out the shape of the sleeve, and you may want to buy a pattern--a cheap pattern you don't even like will do, so long as it has the right sleeve--then use the sleeve AND the armhole from that pattern.



Have fun! Slashing and spreading is a lot of fun for this kind of thing. You may want to test your sleeve in cheap fabric before you cut the good stuff, though. Enjoy!

Thank you!!!!
Mole Princess
Mole Princess
Member since 4/17/12
Posts: 238
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Date: 4/25/13 7:49 AM

One correction to what I said earlier . . . if you spread your slashes by unequal amounts, it WILL change the grain line of the underarm area. If by equal amounts, it won't.

Let us know how it goes!

Quickie
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Quickie
NETHERLANDS
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Date: 4/25/13 8:06 AM

I think That it is also important To compare the shape of your armhole of your unitard to the shape of the armhole of the pattern you use the sleeve of.

Mole Princess
Mole Princess
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Posts: 238
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Date: 4/25/13 1:29 PM

Thanks, Quickie. I was assuming the cap sleeve the OP referred to came from the unitard pattern and matched its armhole. I may have been wrong. I appreciate your chiming in.

Yes--alter the cap sleeve pattern and use its armhole instead of the unitard armhole. Then all will fit together well.

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