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Interfacing and collars
...why do I always have issues?
LDT2011
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LDT2011
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UNITED KINGDOM
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Date: 8/6/13 6:56 AM

Every collar I have ever followed the instructions and interfaced (iron on) has never sat properly. It just lays/sticks out awkwardly. I clip curves and trim seam allowances. But still no difference.
Why? Why does this always happen to me? Especially with round rather than notched collars.

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'The purpose of most fashion is to be ostentatiously non-functional.'

KathySews
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KathySews  Friend of PR
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Date: 8/6/13 8:55 AM

I don't have many answers, just sending morale support. IMO Collars are one of those sewing areas that require more time and focus than the rest of the garment. Trimming, grading, clipping, rolling, steaming within an inch of it's life. I have also run screaming from the sewing room. aaarrrrggggggggggg

A class suggestion (and I am not affiliated, just someone who learned a lot): Islander Sewing System has good information on working with collars, and is currently offering a Craftsy Class called Sew Better Sew Faster. I did the class on DVD years ago and am considering getting the Craftsy class to have for visual referral.

Marie367
Marie367
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In reply to LDT2011 <<
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Date: 8/6/13 10:46 AM

Maybe it is the interfacing? You could try the non-sew in or maybe get a better interfacing? I don't know what you might have available to you but it sounds like an interfacing problem.

kkkkaty
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In reply to LDT2011 <<
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Date: 8/6/13 11:03 AM

when you're at the sewing store buy some small lengths of interfacing and compare them. I used to use the same interfacing for everything, but own an assortment now. There's a knit interfacing, called "Easy knit" in the US, that a lot of people use for everything, and it has a softer drape than some of the other fusibles. It's made of tricot.

You could also use self fabric for interfacing; just cut a third layer of your regular material and use it as a sew-in, instead of iron on.

Test some ideas when you aren't working on a garment, that way the outcome won't be so frustrating

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Viking Lily 545
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a7yrstitch
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a7yrstitch  Friend of PR
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In reply to LDT2011 <<


Date: 8/6/13 11:09 AM

Two things I would consider from your description.

Are you using interfacing that needs to be preshrunk? And, are you using the best type of interfacing for the project?

Are you using collar designs that would benefit from the very tiniest extra bit of fabric in the upper collar to accommodate 'turn of cloth'.

I posted a thread in the Tips section on turn of cloth (turn of the cloth) and will be adding this link,
Fashion Incubator - Collars
The link is a great start and should give you enough information to help you search for more if you need to.

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I have no idea what Apple thought I was saying so be a Peach and credit anything bizarre to auto correct.

a7yrstitch
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In reply to LDT2011 <<


Date: 8/6/13 11:14 AM

And, this blogger has a sewing supply company that has fantastic interfacing. Even if you don't want to order from overseas it is worth checking her site to read the descriptions of the various types of interfacing. And, of course, to check out the tutorials.
Off The Cuff - Sewing Style

Previously mentioned thread,
Beginner's Forum, Turn of Cloth (Turn-of-Cloth).
-- Edited on 8/6/13 11:20 AM --

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I have no idea what Apple thought I was saying so be a Peach and credit anything bizarre to auto correct.

nancy2001
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In reply to LDT2011 <<


Date: 8/6/13 11:33 AM

We need more information to answer your question. Can you describe the problem in greater detail? Are you sewing jackets or tops? Do you have photos of the problem you can post. I suspect the problem is not the interfacing, but what brand and type of interfacing do you use?

------
No sewing project is ever a complete success nor a total failure.

LDT2011
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LDT2011
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Date: 8/6/13 11:38 AM

Half my problem is I don't *understand why* collars are always interfaced.

Is it to
stop stretching? - I always stay stitch, and hand sew.
make fabric stiff? - on thin fabrics yeah but this was suiting fabric why must a collar be stiff? I hate stiff collars.

I did an experiment once. I have a pattern from the 70's it has a shawl collar doesn't call for interfacing in the instructions.
So I did one version with and one without in a polycotton. The one without sat perfect the one with stuck out in a horrible stiff manner.

And I was using lightweight interfacing too.

------
'The purpose of most fashion is to be ostentatiously non-functional.'

LDT2011
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LDT2011
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In reply to nancy2001 <<


Date: 8/6/13 11:41 AM

Quote: nancy2001
We need more information to answer your question. Can you describe the problem in greater detail? Are you sewing jackets or tops? Do you have photos of the problem you can post. I suspect the problem is not the interfacing, but what brand and type of interfacing do you use?

In this particualr case I was using a poly suiting material. For a waistcoat collar. It had an upper and lower pattern different sizes.
the patter version the model is wearing
I use what they have available in my local shop (UK) vilene interfacing. I can't post images at the moment...but will when I get home.

------
'The purpose of most fashion is to be ostentatiously non-functional.'

simplystitches
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Date: 8/6/13 12:59 PM

Are you sewing the outer edges from one end to the other?
When sewn like that you're sewing up one side and down the other.

The rounded collar has bias edges and I find I get a much better result if I stitch from middle back of the collar to the end and go back to the middle back and stitch to the end for the opposite side. That way the stitching is in the same direction on both sides.

While not directly related to interfaced or not the interfacing could be exaggerating the problem of bias edges being sewn in opposite directions.

Debbie

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