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Machine too cold to turn on?
mpbh

mpbh  Friend of PR
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Date: 10/28/13 10:26 AM

I drove 30 minutes to an embroidery workshop this morning. When I arrived, the shop owner said, "You put this machine in the car last night. It is too cold to turn on. You will have to wait several hours." I turned around and came home since I could not work there. The temperature last night was about 30 degrees but it is warmer in the garage. (The machine is a Designer Ruby.) I used to carry a laptop to work in below zero weather and turn it on as soon as I was at my desk and had no problem.
Am I the last to know this important fact?

Mufffet
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Mufffet  Friend of PR
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Date: 10/28/13 10:31 AM

I would have thought that half an hour was enough myself. I have often had a machine int he car going to or coming from a spa treatment and half an hour is sort of my rule of thumb. I wouldn't leave one out in the cold all night - that's for sure. Especially a computerized expensive machine. BBbrrrr.....of course I am pretty much thinking of my machines as having feelings. HAHhahaa...

BUT, surely the store owner could have loaned you another machine to do the workshop. I mean I would never go back there after that sort of treatment!

------
"Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible."
--Dalai Lama

I have sewing machines

quiltingwolf
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Date: 10/28/13 10:31 AM

Sorry but that's just BS. Especially since it was in a warm car for 30 minutes

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kittykate
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kittykate
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Date: 10/28/13 10:52 AM

I agree with the 30 minutes of being in a warm car probably being enough. I do know that if I take a mechanical from the shed in the dead of winter, the metal will sweat and it is sluggish until it is room temp, about an hour.

lgrande
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Date: 10/28/13 11:16 AM

I don't know about this but I experienced the same thing.
I took my Bernina in for service one day after it had been in my car in the garage overnight.
The tech would not work on it until the next day until the machine had warmed up.
I say better safe than sorry so it's okay with me; I know I don't want anyone messing up my $$$$$ sewing machine.

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Linda

Bernina 830LE - Brother Dreamweaver VQ3000 - Bernina B530 - Janome 6600P - Pfaff 1209 - Babylock Evolution - Janome 644 - Babylock Sashiko2 - Babylock BLCS-2

PattiAnnJ
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Date: 10/28/13 11:47 AM

The shop owner was being cautious.

Why do you leave your machine outside?

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"Improvise, adapt and overcome." - Clint Eastwood/Heartbreak Ridge

Learn To Sew
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Date: 10/28/13 11:54 AM

Yes, why did you put it in the car overnight? Why not next to the door you will be going through in the morning? (if no one would be going in/out that door)

I have to agree with the shop owner on this one. Could you imagine what it might have been like to try to sew on a Cold machine? It could easy have broken something. Or worse, messed up the embroidery module or computer so badly that it could have required $$$$ to fix it.

Well, lesson learned. I hope you can take the class again, with a nice, warm machine, all ready to sew.

------
I really enjoy quilting. I love to play with fabrics, colors and pictures. I recently discovered how much fun applique can be. As I love making pictures, landscape quilting can be challenging, but seeing the picture come to life is so rewarding.
Bernina 630, my main machine
Pfaff 2036, my class machine
Babylock Molly
Bernina 1200DA serger
Unique Sewing Cabinet 450L

Vintage Joan
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Vintage Joan
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Date: 10/28/13 12:50 PM

Quote:
I used to carry a laptop to work in below zero weather

I know nothing about computerized sewing machines, but I'm assuming you don't mean you used to put your laptop in the car the night before.

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my shield and my very great reward ~ Gen. 15:1

justgail

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Date: 10/28/13 12:53 PM

The problem is condensation. If it sat out in the car all night, that's plenty of time for it to get cold all the way through. Then bring it into the warm and possibly humid shop. It's the same as taking a cold drink out of the refrigerator and letting it sit out. Even if the room is air conditioned or during winter, moisture forms.

We had a drive replaced in a server, with one that was fresh from the cold warehouse. It went bad before we even finished restoring the data. The 2nd replacement sat in the repair guy's house all night to warm up before it was installed. It did not make the managers happy, they screeched to get it replaced fast the first time, and then they screeched about the delay on the 2nd one.

If it was in a padded case overnight, I don't think a half hour in the car would be enough to warm it through. I'm doing some temperature testing now - the item under test is in a metal box, and we wait 1 hour after the desired temperature is reached before running the test.

I think the shop owner was on the right track, but should have made it clear the possible consequences and let you decide. And they should make it clear that machines should NOT be stored in the car overnight in cold weather before classes. From the owner's side - which is better - someone disappointed about missing a class, or someone royally peeved about a fried sewing machine?

cherylwashere
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Date: 10/28/13 1:22 PM

Same with cameras...do not leave in hot or cold cars. Heat and humidity as well as cold are not the ideal temps for computerized sm's. From what I was told...they need to be kept in temperature controlled rooms...the temps you are comfortable living in... I keep the heat or AC on in my sewing room...

------
Bernina 820, Bernina 330, Pfaff Creative 7530, Janome 1600P

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