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Parsing Sewing Patterns into 3D Garments
andye
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Date: 1/29/14 4:34 AM

I saw this paper recently, and thought it worth posting.

Basically, the authors have figured out how to use a library of flat patterns in order to automatically generate clothing for characters in 3D graphics-- such as games and movies.

Virtual Sewing-- it actually reads the pattern (from, say BurdaStyle), and figures out how the pieces fit together so it can simulate how the fabric drapes over a 3d figure.

I'd really like to see the code. I've worked with the 3D cloth simulator they've used (Sensitive Couture) and though it did a good job simulating cloth over a humanoid figure, the editing tools for actually cutting the cloth lacks a certain amount of finesse.

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Bernina B330
Feet: 1,2,3,3A,4,5,7,8,10,13,16,18,20, 29,32,35,37,50,64,70,71,82,85,86, 92

jacquiJB
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In reply to andye <<


Date: 1/30/14 2:56 AM

Fascinating. Thanks for posting this!

SandiMacD
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Date: 1/30/14 4:16 AM

Enjoyed reading this!

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sewing brings joy and meaning to my life...

ClareinStitches

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In reply to andye <<


Date: 1/30/14 11:58 AM

So interesting, andye.
I suppose that they chose that particulrly tall and slim 'model and her 'arms out' position for some technical/display reason, but the result is a bit disconcerting. Not to say that I'm not impressed!
I do hope this work will continue. Wouldn't it be great to be able to have your own personal croquis and fit pattern pieces straight onto it.
Thank you.

andye
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Date: 1/30/14 3:03 PM

Honesty, don't think that a less than skinny figure will be a major sticking point. The arms are a bit puzzling, but perhaps sleeves are perennially buggy, and a form with raised arms helps the modelers see problems with the simulation more easily.

Here's sensitive couture's sample output-- i ran this on my mac, and rotated the model a bit.

 photo ScreenShot2014-01-30at24541PM_zpsa364dcf4.png

The model is distinctly non-human-- sort of an anthropomorphized armadillo. So assuming that you can get a 3d model of yourself--laser scanners exist, though personally I would not make a special effort until the user interface improves dramatically, and the burda import code becomes available to the general public-- it should be possible to see yourself dressed in virtual cloth.

It's still at the proof of concept stage.

If you can program, or at least compile a program,
Here's the demo. I have not been able to locate the pattern parser, so the example outfits are pretty crude and not up the standards of commercial patterns
-- Edited on 1/30/14 3:05 PM --
-- Edited on 1/30/14 3:06 PM --

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Bernina B330
Feet: 1,2,3,3A,4,5,7,8,10,13,16,18,20, 29,32,35,37,50,64,70,71,82,85,86, 92

andye
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Date: 1/30/14 3:23 PM

OMG. That looks creepy.Let me set your mind at ease.

 photo ScreenShot2014-01-30at32631PM_zps48a136dc.png
-- Edited on 1/30/14 3:32 PM --

------
Bernina B330
Feet: 1,2,3,3A,4,5,7,8,10,13,16,18,20, 29,32,35,37,50,64,70,71,82,85,86, 92

Marilly
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Date: 1/30/14 4:25 PM

This reminds me of Bernina My Label, but I doubt that they would have ever been able to fit the armadillo! Interesting to see the direction this is going. : D

In a related software vein, I remember some years back, a software for making patterns for soft toys from a 3D model by Livesforce. It sounded really neat since it used a more..push and pull method of forming the model once it was built from basic shapes..sorta like Scupltris or ZBrush does so if you weren't a Maya or Lightwave expert you had a chance at figuring it out. In most cases, a 2D turnaround drawings were imported to use as a guides for key viewpoints to form the basic shapes. Further refinements were made by dragging mesh points.
The cool part was that you could draw the seam lines and add darts on the finalized model and then a flat pattern would be generated of these sections. Way too expensive for average Jane unless you going to make it a business, but maybe one day somebody will make an open source. Yes, there was something similar in a freeware called Plushie, but it was horribly buggy.
Shel

beauturbo
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Date: 1/30/14 6:54 PM

Well I got Autocad, Solid Works, Poser, and a bunch of that kind of stuff, and tons of sewing patterns, but I don't think I would try to use them all together to make some real sewing patterns, or combinations of them in a garment, that I would cut out of cloth to actually wear, for me at all, that way.

Just since I don't see the real advantage of that and also kind of because what is simple and quick for a human whom sews to do, with their own eyeballs and something in their hand, and actually feeling the thickness and drape of a fabric, and also getting to try something on, and try to move your actual body in it, done with some "artificial intelligence" on a computer instead, is getting really complicated, and I trust my own eye's, and hands way more on that kind of stuff even. And would be just so much quicker! And just so much less complicated. So I kind of think humans still have the advantage on that kind of thing there though.

They do already have lots of pattern drafting software out there in all sorts of places I believe, but they are not taking Simplicity, Butterick, McCalls or Vouge pattern pieces to do that. Sounds like a fun 3D mix kind of thing to play with computerized, but just much quicker to do for real and not even in a computer instead.

So is the intent to make clothes for some 3D models (like Poser models) in some graphic arts program, from existing human sewing patterns and then render them out, in 2D form, as a printed piece of art, (and just dress your models like that) or is it instead, to use some of that kind of stuff, and existing sewing patterns more as a base for a new sewing pattern drafting kind of software?

andye
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Date: 1/31/14 0:42 AM

Quote:
So is the intent to make clothes for some 3D models (like Poser models) in some graphic arts program, from existing human sewing patterns and then render them out, in 2D form, as a printed piece of art, (and just dress your models like that) or is it instead, to use some of that kind of stuff, and existing sewing patterns more as a base for a new sewing pattern drafting kind of software?


It was submitted to a Graphics Conference, and IIRC, the researchers though it would be most useful for costuming 3D characters in a movie or in a computer game. A lot of work is in that field is geared around "procedural content", or the mass production of objects.

Let's say you want a realistic looking forest. In a forest of hundreds of trees, every tree is unique. But instead of designing 400 trees individually, or a couple of trees and cloning them, the designer writes a program that will generate a realistic looking tree, and randomizes the parameters. Result-- hundreds of different trees, all different, all sufficiently tree like to fool most observers, and yet created in a fraction of the time.

This is similar, except with digital clothing. Now all your orcs can wear the latest fashion, but custom fitted, and made with a variety of materials.

I still think it might, in the future, be useful to preview if a pattern will flatter one's body type.


------
Bernina B330
Feet: 1,2,3,3A,4,5,7,8,10,13,16,18,20, 29,32,35,37,50,64,70,71,82,85,86, 92

ClareinStitches

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In reply to andye <<


Date: 1/31/14 6:47 AM

Quote: andye
< Here's sensitive couture's sample output-- i ran this on my mac, and rotated the model a bit >

Having to appear in that garment would make me feel like an 'anthropomorphized armadillo', too!
But that's a good thing; just what I need, to see how the pattern pieces will fit on my body. Then I can either adjust the pattern to fit the image better, or decide that it won't ever flatter my shape and move on.
The fabric choice is a whole other kettle of fish. I wouldn't ever expect a computer to convey the feel of a fabric even if it can give an impression of how it drapes.

Great post, andye.
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