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Pattern Reviews> Kwik Sew> 2900 (Misses' t-shirts & turtleneck)

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Reviewed by:Elaine Dougan
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About Elaine Douganstar
BC CANADA
Member since: 1/24/07
Reviews written: 15
Sewing skills:Advanced Beginner
Favored by: 4 people
patterns reviewed: 7
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Posted on:3/3/07 7:21 PM
Last Updated:3/3/07 11:38 PM


Review Rating: Very Helpful by 10 people   
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19 Comments      Login to Add a Comment
PVA said...
Thanks for this review, Elaine. This is my favorite pattern. I haven't had problems with the sleeves twisting -- did you keep the pattern on the straight of grain? It's important, even with knits. The photo is too small for me to see the wrinkles, but check the sleeve fabric -- the knit should come down straight from the shoulder. It should't twist. If you trace off the pattern piece from the original make sure you also trace the grainline. HTH, Pat
3/3/07 7:33 PM
Elaine Dougan said...
Thank you, Pat. I tried to make the picture big enough to see, but I really didn't know what I was doing. I realize that the grain needs to be straight, but I have this twisting problem with woven fabric as well. I think it might have something to do with the fit of the sleeve; either it is too tight or the cap is too short. I am getting quite tired of fighting sleeves. I do have a very large upper arm which does not help.
3/3/07 7:40 PM
LauraTS said...
Elaine, if you go in your review and edit the location where the picture is, delete "/tn" and then the picture will link to the full-size photo, not the thumbnail. The correct URL for the full-size pic is http://www.friendsofpr.com/elainedo/2900.JPG It definitely looks to me like there's something wonky with your shoulder and armscye fit. I'm not enough of an expert to suggest a fix for sure, but I'm sure some of the folks on here would be happy to do so.
3/3/07 8:06 PM
Elaine Dougan said...
Thank you, Laura. I still don't know how to properly do the picture part, but I did what you told me to do and now you can see the hoorrible draglines and wrinkles in my top. I sure hope that some clever person can tell me what I am doing that is making them happen.
3/3/07 11:41 PM
Annette1 said...
Hi, Elaine. Your t-shirt looks great! When I read your comments about the sleeves twisting, it sounded vaguely familiar, so I dug out my Sandra Betzina More Power Sewing book. On page 23, she talks about rotating a sleeve. She's referring to a jacket sleeve, but I wonder if the principle might apply here, as well. Let's see, I'll try to edit here. She says to try rotating the sleeve cap clockwise and or counter clockwise. Sleeve wrinkles can be a result of poor posture or uneven arm fullness. Both can be corrected by slight rotation. She says to baste your sleeve in from front to back notches in underarm area only, and leave the sleeve cap pinned in. Then try it on. (Be careful!) :o) If sleeve creases slightly in front, rotate sleeve cap 1/4 to 1/2 inch toward back. Begin with 1/4 inch rotation, and increase if that doesn't eliminate the problem. Do the reverse if the sleeve creases in the back. She says if the sleeve creases are not in front or back but horizontal in cap, then the sleeve cap is too tall and too narrow. (You wouldn't think this would be the case with a Kwik Sew pattern, though.) If that IS the case, though, she says to trim off 1/4 inch from the head of the sleeve. (I often do this when putting in sleeves, not by trimming them, but by just edging the sleeve out a little through the cap as I'm sewing it in.) Then add 1/4 inch to sides of sleeve cap, ending at notches, then smooth out cap lines. A slightly shorter, wider sleeve cap results in a sleeve that fits easily in the original armhole and eliminates horizontal wrinkles, she says. Now I'm looking in her Power Sewing book on page 132, Sleeves for the Large Arm. (Gee, page 132 is calling my name.) She says to measure the arm at the fullest part then add 1-1/2 to 2 inches of ease. Then compare that to the pattern at the same point, and if you come up short, then add the difference to the sleeve pattern at the side seams. (I often use Nancy Zieman's pivot method to widen my sleeves.) Then she said if you have trouble easing it in after you added width at side seams, you may need to run an easeline along the whole upper part of the sleeve, not just between the notches. Hope some of this helps. Boy, these books are kind of like medical manuals: If you look at them long enough, you start to think you've got every problem in there. :o) Best of luck to you!
3/4/07 0:22 AM
Debbie Cook said...
I think the shoulders are still too wide, and you need to adjust for sloping shoulders. That should correct some of the problem wrinkles, but anytime you use a flatter sleevecap (which is what most KS knit tops have), you are going to have some wrinkles.
3/4/07 1:13 AM
Debbie Cook said...
BTW, congrats on your first review!
3/4/07 1:13 AM
Helen near Sydney said...
I think you accomplished what you set out to achieve which was a good muslin. Others have good suggestions re: the sleeves, mine is to try not to be too distracted by the fabric, this is definitely a wearable muslin.
3/4/07 3:45 AM
fuzzygalore said...
I second Debbie - I think you need to make the shoulders even narrower, but most of all that you need to adjust for sloping shoulders. I think you're going through too many gyrations with armholes this and that. One thing I learned from Sandra Betzina is that if you get to the point where you're doing half a dozen adjustments you're probably doing it all wrong :-). She says you're either not doing the right adjustment (with the blind spots that most of us have with our bodies) or not doing them boldly enough. I'd suggest going back to the original pattern, and starting at least a size smaller in the upper body (aside from shoulder-slope related wrinkles, it looks way too loose up there). Can you get someone to measure you between armhole creases and go from there to pick a size? Narrowing the shoulders some more may or may not be necessary. Then taking a big wedge out for shoulder slope, I'd guess you need to take out much more than 1/4". Then lower the armhole accordingly. You may still have to rotate the shoulder forward. You then probably have to do an FBA, which should allow you to have smoother fit in both the upper body and the waist, which is also awfully wrinkly. But if you're in a muslin mood, why not try these changes one at a time, till you're satisfied you've done enough in that direction? At least smaller size and stronger slope at first?
3/4/07 4:48 AM
FloraNature said...
Hi Elaine, those diagonal wrinkles appear to start at the shoulder point and fall down almost to the elbow. If they disappear when you lift your arm, I would suggest that more sleeve cap height is required, in order to compensate for the half-inch narrow shoulder alteration you made. If there is any seam allowance left on your muslin you could try letting out a bit, and seeing if that improves the fit. Best of luck...
3/4/07 5:24 AM
Em's Summer said...
This is a great muslin, and it looks nice even with the sleeve issues that you're having, but I'm glad that it's just a muslin as I think you'll look much prettier in another color. I agree that you should narrow the shoulders a little and if that doesn't get rid of the wrinkles, then and only then should you start adjusting the sleeves. The armscye and sleevecap are difficult to tweak for most people, and if I were you, I'd find a better fitting pattern if the adjustment ends up taking too much time. Good luck! Em
3/4/07 8:22 AM
carolynw said...
Hi Elaine and welcome to PR - nice to see another Canuk onboard! I agree with all who have said the shoulder needs to be narrower - I also think the sleeve may be too big. However, after all that I think it is quite wearable.Sometimes we tend to judge ourselves far too harshly - for a quick jolt back to reality I sometimes look at the way RTW fits and feel I am not doing so badly after all !!
3/4/07 10:05 AM
Elaine Dougan said...
Thank you to all of you kind people. I am overwhelmed with all the good advice you have given. I think that you are all so wonderful to take the time to share your ideas. I was nervous about showing my picture and asking for advice, but you have all been so generous with your time and knowledge. I think I will just finish this muslin and try your suggestions on a new project. Again, thank you for all your kind words.
3/4/07 11:31 AM
Mini said...
The other comments are helpful, so I won't reiterate, but you will definitely get a better fit with a different pattern. You might like one of the Jalie patterns, (they are a Canadian company!) which have nice fitted tee's. This one is too broad shouldered for you, and doesn't have the right sleeve cap shape. Kwik Sew patterns are easy to sew and have nice instructions, but their fit is not ideal for every figure, especially for mature women. I stopped using them because it would take too much time to do all the adjustments needed-and there are other pattern companies that do a better job. You might want to check the reviews for Pamela's (that's the company name) tee pattern. I haven't used it but it has had favorable reviews from women with your figure type, so it might be worth a try. P.S. It's always okay to move on to a different pattern if you didn't get a good fit after making a reasonable effort-I never fight a pattern to the bitter end. Life is just too short and there are lots more patterns out there:)!
3/4/07 11:49 AM
Elaine Dougan said...
Thank you, Mini. I have read about Jalie patterns and now I think I will give them a try. I hate to admit that I can't fix a fitting problem, but you are right. I should try another pattern instead of being obstinate about fixing this one.
3/4/07 12:06 PM
OP Gal said...
I don't have anything to add to what's been said. I have the same problems with fitting sleeves that you're having. If I get them all solved, I'll let you know. ;-) Oh, and welcome to PR!
3/4/07 7:24 PM
AnneM said...
Really, you are being far to critical of your top, though; it is definitely wearable. You got some great input here (I sometimes have the same problem, so I have to read those comments carefully). Also, check out the article archive here (see link on left); there is one (by Mini) that talks about twisting sleeves.
3/6/07 6:09 PM
Annette1 said...
Well, I was so proud of myself, because I just found Mini's article in the archive about the spiraling sleeve, so I came over here to tell you all about it, and AnneM has beaten me to the punch! (Show-off.) I also thought the article in the archives by Kenneth King was interesting (about sleeves, too). What I was actually LOOKING for was something on what sewing machine is best when you really just want to MAKE CLOTHES (as opposed to quilting or embroidering, etc.) It seems like most sewing machines have a lot more bells and whistles than I would ever use. I just want the BEST of what I need, and nothing else. (Not too picky, am I?)
3/6/07 7:55 PM
Elaine Dougan said...
Thanks Anne and Annette. I had read that article before, but I just reread it. It has given me the incentive to retry another muslin. I know I have to scoop the front armhole. I was just nervous about taking out too much. Nothing ventured; nothing gained. I will try!
3/7/07 9:55 AM
 
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